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    Medical Insight in Having an Orgasm

    The orgasm is a massive part of why sex is so satisfying and desirable for men and women. Orgasms are releases of built-up sexual tension, but the physiological changes in the body as a result of orgasms are interesting from a health and medical viewpoint.

    Men and women don’t always orgasm in sex, and this is entirely normal. In fact, most women can’t orgasm by penetrative sex alone and need external stimulation to climax. Despite this, orgasms offer us a massive amount of health benefits. They are providing us with more reason to encourage a healthy sex life of our own.

    How can we improve our sex life?

    There are plenty of ways to improve your sex life. First, it’s essential to understand many influential factors on one’s libido and desire for sex. For example, stress, anxiety, low confidence, and underlying health conditions can reduce libido. Therefore, it’s essential to understand whether anything outside the bedroom affects your sex life. Then you can start experimenting with new ideas inside the bedroom. For example, many couples rely on their favourite adult retailer for new sex toys and accessories to have more exciting sex. There may also be different sexual fantasies or avenues of exploration. Either way, it’s crucial to advocate open and honest communication between you and your partner to understand one another’s needs and interests. A simple, kind, and friendly conversation is always a good place to start.

    Medical Benefits of Orgasms: What happens in the body?

    Our natural feelings of happiness and pleasure stem from many chemicals that naturally occur in our brains. Dopamine, serotonin, endorphins, and oxytocin are all released in response to certain activities, and each has lasting positive effects on the body. For example, serotonin is known as our body’s natural anti-depressant, whereas endorphins are our natural mood boosters.

    When it comes to sex and relationships, oxytocin is the chemical of interest. It is released by the pituitary gland and produces feelings of love and connection. It’s often called the “cuddle hormone” or the body’s natural “love drug”. Oxytocin is released when we orgasm during sex, which is why orgasms feel great, especially when shared with someone you love.

    Due to the release of happy chemicals in the brain, orgasms offer a host of unexpected health benefits beyond the bedroom. Most of these are associated with physiological changes that occur in response to the release of these brain chemicals.

    The release of sexual tension you feel with an orgasm isn’t just physical but mental too. That’s because the release of oxytocin and endorphins stimulate relaxation. Therefore, orgasms have been proven to reduce stress levels.

    Endorphins have similar chemical structures to morphine and play a massive role in our body’s pain-sensing systems and pathways. Therefore, whatever aches and pains you may be experiencing, it seems orgasms can get you on the right track to feeling better. The way orgasms relieve stress and enhance mood also positively impact one’s perception of pain.

    Regular orgasms have also been shown to have remarkable effects on our immunity. When we orgasm, research has found an increase in leukocytes (white blood cells) in the body. This helps regulate immune function, help protect us from common colds, infections and even improve fertility. Even more reason to head to the bedroom instead of the pharmacy next time you’re ill.

    Since sex is also a form of exercise, it causes blood flow around the body. This helps essential nutrients, oxygen, and minerals to reach the brain and important organs. They’re particularly beneficial for our skin since the blood flow promotes collagen production, which keeps skin looking plump and youthful.

    In conclusion, there’s plenty of scientific research to demonstrate the health benefits of orgasms, giving us plenty more reasons to maintain a healthy sex life.

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