How to Build Employee Engagement

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Years of data have shown that higher employee engagement, and a strong emotional and mental connection the employee has towards the workplace have a lot of positive benefits – which include reduced stress, improved job satisfaction, and health, and also increased job retention, productivity, and profitability.

Being transparent

When employees and team members don’t know how their work connects to both the short- and long-term goals, they become less productive and more stressed– especially during times of uncertainty. Your job is to help them get the big picture or understand the role they are playing when it comes to helping the company reach its goals. While you might not be in a position to share everything with them, you can provide them with information so that they know how their work is contributing to the company’s mission. If there is something they want to know but you can’t share it with them, be honest and transparent about why. Ambiguity comes with a lot of stress; it is your responsibility to reduce that. A study found out that a manager communicating with their employees regularly through direct reports, were three times more likely to be engaged when compared to when managers didn’t communicate with them. Still, the study found out that only 40% of employees understand the strategic goals of their company.

Ensuring people are in the right roles

When team members loathe doing their jobs, then you can’t expect them to be engaged. You need to make sure that their strengths and talents are aligned with the responsibilities and expectations of their roles. Regularly check in with our direct reports. The conversations don’t even have to be formal – you can talk to them about their interests, passions, and goals. The information is going to help you assign them the projects they find meaningful. You will then follow up to make sure they have all the tools needed to succeed.

Giving as much autonomy as possible

When possible, try giving your team control of the management of projects. When employees have the option of deciding what to do, when to do it, and how much to spend on each task, it results in employees being 43% less likely to experience high levels of burnout. Using a time tracking tool like Tracktime24 will assist in this. You first have to make sure that the employee is ready to work independently. You can ask them to shadow you on a project or task first, then you allow them to practice as you supervise them. You are going to give them feedback and determine if they are able to work on their own.

Demonstrating a commitment to their growth and progression

It is not a good idea to hold tightly to your talent. While it is not possible to promote all your employees every two years, try to make them feel like you are providing them with learning and growth opportunities. You can do this by supporting internal mobility. Let them have a chance of moving around or moving on if that is the right step in their career. When you show that you are committed to their growth, it is going to increase trust between you and them.

Creating a culture of recognition

When you recognize the contributions and hard work of your team members publicly, it increases the feeling of belonging and connection and decreases feelings of stress. Companies with high-recognition cultures tend to perform better and have less turnover compared to those that don’t. this is why recognition and support make it easier for employees to cope with the demands of work because they know that their effort is valued. A good time to call out good performance is during team meetings. It can also be effective to use unexpected gestures communicating sincere appreciation and build a positive reputation. If one of your employees closes a new client, congratulate them publicly. When you have a culture in which pears show gratitude and recognize each other’s efforts, then they are more likely to be satisfied and happy in their roles.